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Spinach, feta and pine nut tart and tartlets

These spinach, feta and pine nut tart or tartletts are delicious & stunning to look. The dill and nutmeg lift them from a normal tart to something special.

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The inspiration for these spinach, feta and pine nut tarts came from Greece, from a holiday we had years ago. We fuelled our trips around the various islands with lots of spinach and feta pastries for lunches. These were puff pastry parcels; hand-sized rectangles of warm, salty, soft, buttery goodness. I wanted to replicate some of these flavours using open, light tarts instead, since I like the idea of having the tart filling on show to get people salivating right away.

It soon become clear that replicating the puff pastry element in these tarts made them feel a little too near to vol-au-vonts, which wasn’t the effect I was after. Next I tried shortcrust. As I mentioned in the apple, prune and almond cake introduction, shortcrust pastry was the first thing I learnt to make, and so it often becomes my standard choice for a new recipe. The shortcrust pastry tartlets were pretty good, however making the pastry, blind baking, making the filling and then cooking again, made the recipe far too fiddly and time consuming. Somehow it lacked the simplicity that I required for lunchtime cooking. So, I finally settled on the next obvious candidate; filo. Filo pastry is quicker to use (well it is, when you buy it) and makes a very light tart base with a satisfying crunch as you bite through it, and best of all – no blind baking involved.
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The filling began as a mixture of spinach, feta, onion, nutmeg, egg and milk. I quickly learned that cheap feta was chalky and tasted nothing like the real thing. But, even with an upgrade to tasty feta something was missing. It needed another flavour and, after a few false starts, I tried dill which added the depth I was looking for.

Satisfied with the taste the final touch was to find something that would add some interest, sparkle and texture on top of these spinach, feta and pine nut tarts. Spinach can look a bit drab without something to break up the green (not good for getting people salivating!). So on the final attempt of making these tartlets I dressed the top with toasted pine nuts.

Although the recipe makes eight little tarts, it works equally well as one large tart to share. I find an oblong tin 12 cm x 35 cm about right, or you could use a 23 cm or 9 inch round tin.

I hope you have as much fun using this recipe and eating the results, as I did writing it.

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Spinach, feta and pine nut tarts and tartlets

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You can serve both the tart and tartlets either hot or cold. If serving cold, wait until completely cool before storing in an air tight container, otherwise the pastry will lose it’s crunch.

  • Author:
  • Prep Time: 25 minutes
  • Cook Time: Tart - 40 minutes, Tartletts - 25 minutes
  • Total Time: 43 minute
  • Yield: 4

Ingredients

  • 1 clove of garlic
  • 1/2 tbsp oil
  • 135 g / 5 oz frozen spinach thawed or 175 g / 6 oz fresh spinach cooked until wilted spinach
  • 25 g / 1 oz fresh dill
  • 100 g / 3 ½ oz feta cheese
  • ¼ tsp nutmeg
  • black pepper
  • 3 large eggs
  • 100 ml / 3 ½ fl oz milk
  • ¼ tsp salt
  • 4 sheets of filo pastry each measuring 26 cm x 29 cm
  • 50g / 2 oz butter
  • 25 g / 1 oz toasted pine nuts

Tartlet tin size – I use a muffin tin, 3 cm / 1 ¼” deep x 7 cm / 2 ¾” wide at the widest point.
Tart tin size – 12 cm / 4 ¾” wide x 35 cm / 13 ¾” long, or you could use a 23 cm / 9” wide round tin.

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 180 C / 160 C fan / 320 F and Gas Mark 3.
  2. Finely chop the onion and garlic.
  3. Heat the oil in a frying pan and then over a medium heat, fry the onion and garlic until the onion is soft and translucent.
  4. Roughly chop the spinach. Remove the large stalks from the dill and finely chop the remaining small stalks and leaves. Add the spinach and dill to the onion, stir to combine and cook for two minutes.
  5. Chop up the feta into small and slightly larger chunks. Add this to the pan. The small chucks will melt while the larger ones will stay intact.
  6. Grate in the nutmeg and add black pepper to taste and remove from the heat. You can add salt, but with the feta I don’t think it needs it. There is salt in the egg custard.
  7. Measure out the milk in a measuring jug and then add the eggs, and salt. Whisk the eggs well with a fork to combine.
  8. Unroll the pastry and melt the butter.

Tart
Using a pastry brush paint each sheet of pastry with the melted butter. Then position the first two sheets to line the edges and base of the tin, they will overlap. Then repeat until all the pastry is used.

Tartlets
Cut four 12 cm x 12 cm squares of pastry from each large sheet. Using a pastry brush, paint two of the small squares with melted butter, then put one on top of the other at 45 degrees so they create a star. Use the brush to carefully push the pastry into the tin. Repeat until your have eight tartlet cases.

  1. Put the spinach mixture into the pastry case/s.
  2. Pour the egg mixture over the spinach. You may want to open the oven and put the tart/tartlets on the oven shelf before pouring the egg mixture over.
  3. Scatter with the pine nuts and either close the oven door or put it in the oven.
  4. The tart will take 30 – 40 mins, the tartlets will take 20 – 25 mins. Remove from the oven when light brown in places on the top and enjoy.

Notes

Total carbohydrate per 2 tartlets – 13g
Total carbohydrate per ¼ of tart – 14g

Left over ingredients? Have a look at these other recipes:
Feta
Chicken, butternut squash and walnut salad
Roasted carrot and hazelnut tart

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One thought on “Spinach, feta and pine nut tart and tartlets

  1. these are so pretty. I grew up with large cakes ratehr than muffins and pastries, and I never think of making individual, bite-size tartelettes. but they are so much less messy, and the kids love them! i just finally invested in a muffin pan and some really cool rose-shaped silicone mini-pans maybe I’ll use them for caprese minis.

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